The 956 Alt

Oct 21

(Source: ashley1215)

mona1017:

Beautiful shot of a #hibiscus flower #hibisco #FlorDeJamaica #SouthTexas #rgv 🌺 (at Linn, Texas)

mona1017:

Beautiful shot of a #hibiscus flower #hibisco #FlorDeJamaica #SouthTexas #rgv 🌺 (at Linn, Texas)

[video]

[video]

anniesboobs:

Resaca in UTB.
Martha told me, that someone told her, that, supposedly, one time the resaca dried up for a long time, so they planted trees. It got flooded again eventually, so the trees died and their corpses remain stuck to the ground.

anniesboobs:

Resaca in UTB.

Martha told me, that someone told her, that, supposedly, one time the resaca dried up for a long time, so they planted trees. It got flooded again eventually, so the trees died and their corpses remain stuck to the ground.

(Source: lomography.com, via utbrownsville)

anniesboobs:

UTB.

anniesboobs:

UTB.

(Source: lomography.com, via utbrownsville)

letusfinishlife:

Blood moon

letusfinishlife:

Blood moon

(via utbrownsville)

(Source: letusfinishlife, via utbrownsville)

Oct 15

ismaelrgv:

Brownsville! Help stop wage theft in your community!
Protest Sub-minimum Wages at Estella’s Restaurant
Imagine getting paid less than $7.25 an hour, many workers in the Restaurant Industry in Brownsville and other Rio Grande Valley Cities do not have to imagine, this is their reality.
Join Fuerza del Valle Workers’ Center (FVWC) member as she takes a stand against subminimum wage pay at her former employer’s, Estella’s Restaurant, place of business.
Join us as we take a stand against sub poverty wages.
While other cities around the nation are fighting to elevate wages to $15 an hour it is beyond imagination we still are fighting just to get minimum wage respected, to get a poverty wage respected by local employers.
Come out and picket with FVWC.
Friday October 17, 2014 12pm-2pm
Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/548666045266764/

ismaelrgv:

Brownsville! Help stop wage theft in your community!

Protest Sub-minimum Wages at Estella’s Restaurant

Imagine getting paid less than $7.25 an hour, many workers in the Restaurant Industry in Brownsville and other Rio Grande Valley Cities do not have to imagine, this is their reality.

Join Fuerza del Valle Workers’ Center (FVWC) member as she takes a stand against subminimum wage pay at her former employer’s, Estella’s Restaurant, place of business.

Join us as we take a stand against sub poverty wages.

While other cities around the nation are fighting to elevate wages to $15 an hour it is beyond imagination we still are fighting just to get minimum wage respected, to get a poverty wage respected by local employers.

Come out and picket with FVWC.

Friday October 17, 2014
12pm-2pm

Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/548666045266764/

(via chuparrosa)

THIS SUNDAY IN BROWNSVILLE

THIS SUNDAY IN BROWNSVILLE

patrickagarcia:

Burn your fire for no witness - with the rest of us: November 6, 2014. 

patrickagarcia:

Burn your fire for no witness - with the rest of us: November 6, 2014. 

patrickagarcia:

95% of the shows I announce have often been bands I’ve been working on for over the span of eight months to sometimes years. It sounds stupid, but considering where I live and where we’re coming from, it is special- and it is different.
South Texas is not like San Antonio or any other smaller city ‘on the way’ to another big touring market. It’s a smaller area that makes little to zero sense on a touring level because it is literally out of the way.
South Texas also deals with a bizarre and unjustifiably stupid narrative of ‘border wars’ and ‘cartel violence’ that is often the consequence of an intentional political talking point. One wouldn’t imagine this comes into play with something as small as ‘booking your small time punk band’ - but it does. 
Anyways, I get good vibes off the shit I do. Things like this, like this show.
I worked on Lemuria for years. I doubt many down here will know about this, but hey, if it means anything to you that a dude pushing 30 takes pride in his passion ‘project’, well, shit, that might make one consider - meh, ok. Tbh, I have no interest in persuading anyone. Sorry, i’m just, being. I hate selling shit. When it feels shitty, i stop. :pauses for five minutes- edits out bad words: Ok.  Feels better now.
Also, this flyer is literally a picture of my table top. Cell phone pic of an encyclopedia of an entry I have already forgotten. Some dried out fliers I picked from the garden in my complex. 

patrickagarcia:

95% of the shows I announce have often been bands I’ve been working on for over the span of eight months to sometimes years. It sounds stupid, but considering where I live and where we’re coming from, it is special- and it is different.

South Texas is not like San Antonio or any other smaller city ‘on the way’ to another big touring market. It’s a smaller area that makes little to zero sense on a touring level because it is literally out of the way.

South Texas also deals with a bizarre and unjustifiably stupid narrative of ‘border wars’ and ‘cartel violence’ that is often the consequence of an intentional political talking point. One wouldn’t imagine this comes into play with something as small as ‘booking your small time punk band’ - but it does. 

Anyways, I get good vibes off the shit I do. Things like this, like this show.

I worked on Lemuria for years. I doubt many down here will know about this, but hey, if it means anything to you that a dude pushing 30 takes pride in his passion ‘project’, well, shit, that might make one consider - meh, ok. Tbh, I have no interest in persuading anyone. Sorry, i’m just, being. I hate selling shit. When it feels shitty, i stop. :pauses for five minutes- edits out bad words: Ok.  

Feels better now.

Also, this flyer is literally a picture of my table top. Cell phone pic of an encyclopedia of an entry I have already forgotten. Some dried out fliers I picked from the garden in my complex. 

patrickagarcia:

The moon in the daytime (at STC Starr County Campus)

patrickagarcia:

The moon in the daytime (at STC Starr County Campus)

pharrfromheaven:

The cool people from Texas Folklife posted this great photo. 
This is Don Jose Moreno, originally from Mexico, he has been residing in the Rio Grande Valley for more than 40 years. Wonderful musician, I love his fiddle instrumental version of “Maria Bonita”. He taught for many years at the Narciso Martinez Cultural Arts Center in San Benito. 

pharrfromheaven:

The cool people from Texas Folklife posted this great photo. 

This is Don Jose Moreno, originally from Mexico, he has been residing in the Rio Grande Valley for more than 40 years. Wonderful musician, I love his fiddle instrumental version of “Maria Bonita”. He taught for many years at the Narciso Martinez Cultural Arts Center in San Benito. 

Border Love on the Rio Grande: African American Men and Latinas in the Rio Grande Valley of South Texas (1850-1940) | The Black Past: Remembered and Reclaimed -

Excerpt: 

These interracial marriages along the Lower Rio Grande Valley for the most part were black men marrying ethnic Mexican women or first generation Tejanas (Texas-born women of Mexican descent). Typical of these marriages was the union of Louis and Angle Rutledge of Hidalgo County. Louis Rutledge was a black male born in Alabama who lived in the county’s Second Precinct in 1900. In 1886, he married Angle, an ethnic Mexican woman who was born to Mexican parents. The Rutledges, who had been married 14 years by the time of the 1900 census, had seven children ranging from two to thirteen years of age. The census also shows that all the children attended school.  

It was more common for blacks and ethnic Mexicans to cross racial lines and marry at this time and in this area of Texas than any other section of the state. Since ethnic Mexicans were considered white by Texas officials and the U.S. government, such marriages were a violation of the state’s anti-miscegenation laws. Yet, there is no evidence that anyone in South Texas was prosecuted for violating this law.

Moreover, there seemed to be little stigma attached to these marriages from the families involved. In 1900, Juan Zuniga’s daughter, Redacinde Jackson, lost her black husband. She then returned with her children to her father’s home. Interracial families were often what would today be called blended families since both husband and wife brought children from previous marriages into the new households. Juan Singletary of Hidalgo County had two stepsons, Ballagar and Davie Solis, living with him. Both were sons of Antonia, his ethnic Mexican wife. Nagario Jackson also had a stepson living in his household. His name was Christ Visnuevo, the stepson of his ethnic Mexican wife, Eugiruia. As the given names Juan and Nagario suggest, these “black” men themselves had ethnic Mexican mothers and thus represented a second generation of racially blended families.

[Read more at the link above…]

(Source: pharrfromheaven)